Monday, January 12, 2015

Coming of Age Day

Today was Seijin no hi, and I should have been in front of Futaara shrine with my camera trying to sneak a few photos of girls all dolled up in kimonos and wrapped in rabbit fur stoles.
But I wasn't.
Why?
It turns out that in our lovely city the day for 20 year olds celebrating their coming of age was held yesterday.
So even though the actual public holiday is today, the fun stuff took place yesterday.
Why?
Out of consideration for the freshly minted adults.
If they party hard on Sunday, they have all Monday to recover and can show up for work on Tuesday without raging hangovers.
See? That's how considerate our great city is. No wonder I love living here :-)

As I wasn't able to take any photos today, I found some from two years ago.

That was one coming of age day to remember.
The weather was getting progressively worse and worse. And when it couldn't get any worse, the train service got suspended due to snow.

I was having lunch with friends in Omiya and, along with a couple thousand other people, we got stuck there.



There were shinkansens going south, but nothing going north. Which was where we needed to go in order to get home.

We eventually did get home. It cost a lot of money and took more than 12 hours.
And I've been hating Omiya ever since.


At least today it was sunny. And so far - no snow this winter. Yay!

Have a great week!


Sunday, January 11, 2015

Eel be back

Narita city is famous for unagi. That means eel. Freshwater eel, to be exact.
Why eels in Narita? No idea.
Back in the olden days, supposedly, there were eels in Tonegawa (Tone river), but that must have been a long time ago.
These days Narita gets its eels by plane. Having the airport right there is a huge advantage, I'm sure.

On the main drag from the train station to Naritasan temple there are about 60 unagi restaurants. Some are big and famous, some are small, but all of them get their eels fresh.
How fresh?
Live fresh.

During our walk to the temple we passed by many unagi restaurants.
You can watch your fresh eels being turned into eel fillets right in front of your eyes.
Like this:


These guys work with the deadly efficiency of Terminators.
Grab a still moving eel.
Drive a spike through its head to secure it to the table.
Slice, clean, chop.
Ready.
Next.


And the finished product, cooked and served, should look more or less like this:

image: wikipedia


I'm a big fan of grilled unagi. It's delicious. Eating unagi is easy.
What's hard is finding good unagi.
The stores here are flooded with cheap eels from China. And I admit it, I tried it. It tasted like garbage.

Most of the cheap unagi you can find at Japanese fast food joints is Chinese. Good unagi is pricey. And unlike cheap unagi, it actually tastes good.

So next time you have a long layover in Narita, catch the train to the city, and take a walk up the main street to the temple. And try some good unagi while you're there.

This photo was taken during my first visit to Narita city. Not on New Year's Eve. On a normal evening the whole place looked like after a zombie apocalypse.



Yes, eel be back. I can't wait to return to Narita city!

Tuesday, January 6, 2015

New Year's Eve at Naritasan Temple

A wise man (though in reality he's more of a wise guy) once said that information is like fresh fish. So with that in mind, I'm going to serve you now stuff that is a week old. Well, better late than never.
(you'll get your fresh fish in the next post, I promise!)

Naritasan temple is a very special temple to me. Sentimental reasons, you might say. And though I'm a fan of Buddhist temples in general, Naritasan will always have a very special place in my heart. It was a place where, once upon a time, one chapter of my life came to an abrupt end, and a new one began.

So when a chance to end the old year and welcome the new one at Naritasan presented itself I couldn't pass it up. I just couldn't. For old times sakes. To remember the good. And to forget the bad and the ugly.
And that's how on December 31st (can't believe it was just last week), I found myself, armed with my camera, walking very purposely (with a brief stop for some very potent Thai food) along the winding streets of Narita city.

This being the last day of the year, the streets were pretty crowded. It seemed the entire town (and parts of the neighboring prefectures) had exactly the same idea. I had not seen that many foreigners in 5 years in Tochigi as during that one evening in Narita. Amazing. Or not.



The temple, its formal name is Naritasan Kongo-o-in Shinshoji (it's the lead temple of the Chisan sect of Shingon Buddhism) was exactly as I remembered it. But this time it was all dressed up for New Year's Day festivities.

The lower courtyard was filled with stands selling everything from daruma dolls to sheep cell phone straps (yep, you got it, 2015 is the year of the sheep).



Because it was dark, the Nio figures were impossible to photograph. So here's my excuse to visit the temple yet again, this time during daytime. Ha! Crafty me!



I'm not going to bore you with the wiki details, if you're interested you can google them.
I'm just going to show you what it looked like.


The  cops were busy calibrating the spotlights in preparation for the midnight service and actually helped me capture this reflection of the three-storied pagoda.

And this is how it looked like in real life:


The plan was to go back to the hotel, take a rest, and then return for the midnight bell ringing. But as with all best laid plans, it didn't turn out that way. So here, yet another excuse for me to return to Naritasan. Awesome!


And the other side:


It's a quite odd feeling to walk around the temple grounds at night when the place is empty. But it felt even odder when despite the darkness, the temple was full of life.


And everything was brightly lit.


Of course I forgot my goshuin book, stupid me. To be at Naritasan on December 31st and not get a red temple stamp? Sacrilegious! No choice but to buy a brand new goshuin book. And guess what? They had it in pink and it matched my jacket exactly.


And here's the stamp:


I can't wait to return there. Soon I hope.


Happy new Year of the Sheep!!!



May it be a good one!